Curry Mushroom Toast – Vintage Recipe, Cooking Club 1908

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A vintage 1908 recipe for Curry Mushroom Toast, adapted by Tori Avey from Cooking Club Magazine on The History Kitchen. … find in my old cook books. There are some truly horrendous meals in some of those old books. … As for the food served in 1908, we can surmise from the Cooking Club Menu Suggestions that folks were indulging in dishes like baked bananas with rice, boiled sauerkraut with dumplings, baked stuffed heart (oh my!), flannel cakes, jellied veal and orange snow.

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The Legends of Pasta alla Carbonara a/k/a Pasta with Bacon & Eggs

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I referred to “La Cucina, The Regional Cooking of Italy” by the Italian Academy of Cuisine to confirm that American G.I.s in Italy during World War II had a habit of taking their daily rations of eggs and bacon to local restaurants where the cooks combined them with Italian food to create an American style meal.

Without a doubt, this is a legend because after doing some extensive historical research in my cookbook room at Jasper’s this past week, I found that carbonara dates back to 1837 where a recipe was noted in the cookbook “La Cucina Teirico Pratica”.

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Upstairs and downstairs in historic cookbooks

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Anne Bayne cookbook, circa 1700 | Szathmary Culinary Manuscripts and Cookbooks.

While “Downton Abbey” fans tune in to season 4 in record numbers and our Special Collections department celebrates with an exhibition of period cookbooks, volunteers at the Libraries’ DIY History crowdsourcing site continue to transcribe historic recipes handwritten by real-life Mrs. Patmores.

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A-Z of unusual ingredients: verjus – Telegraph

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This week, V is for verjus: a sour medieval staple that is suddenly having a revival. 

It’s commonplace for recipes to come and go in the cycle of food fashions. But for a stock ingredient to disappear from recipe books, only to be resurrected centuries later, is almost unprecedented.

This is what has happened to verjus. The acidic juice made from pressing unripe grapes or crab apples was something of a storecupboard staple in medieval kitchens. …

See on www.telegraph.co.uk